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Insulin resistance increases weight gain and COVID-19 risk.

Why insulin resistance increases the risk of weight gain

Insulin carries sugar from your blood into your cells. If you are insulin resistant, your body has to release more insulin to perform this task. These higher insulin levels increase the amount of fat you store. Insulin also inhibits the breakdown of stored fat, so losing weight is difficult whilst your insulin levels are high.

Insulin resistance and COVID-19 

Insulin resistance can also affect your risk when it comes to COVID-19. A study of COVID-19 patients in China found that insulin resistance was associated with increased risk of severity of the disease and increased mortality.

Are YOU at increased risk of insulin resistance?

If you are ‘apple’ shaped and carry weight around your abdomen you are more likely to have or develop insulin resistance If you are ‘pear’ shaped with weight around your hips, bottom and thighs you are less likely to develop insulin resistance.

All you need is a tape measure to  determine which group you fit into. Measure your waist at the narrowest point and your hips at the widest point. Then divide your waist measurement by your hip measurement. If this figure is greater than 0.8 (for women) or 0.95 (for men) you are more likely to have or develop insulin resistance.

What to do if you are at risk of insulin resistance

If you are overweight or at risk of insulin resistance then balancing your blood sugar is particularly important. Not only does it help you lose weight, it also improves your sensitivity to insulin. There are a number of steps you need to take to balance your blood sugar. One of these is to chose unrefined carbs instead of refined ‘white’ carbs. So chose carbs such as wholemeal bread, brown rice, oats, millet and barley instead of white bread, white rice, white flour, cakes, biscuits etc. Delve deeper, get our ebook: Your fat storage hormone

References

Ren H, Yang Y, Wang F, Yan Y, Shi X, Dong K, Yu X, Zhang S  (2020) Association of the Insulin Resistance Marker TyG Index With the Severity and Mortality of COVID-19. Cardiovasc Diabetol19(1):58 https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32393351/

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